RW Intermediate Half Marathon Plan (14 weeks)

Training Load By Week
Training Load By Week

This 14-week plan was designed by the experts at Runner's World for those who have been running consistently for several years and regularly log an average of 25 to 30 miles per week. It's geared for those who may have finished a half marathon and now want to finish faster. It features two days of rest and five days of running each week, including hill work, tempo runs, and a long run that starts at seven miles and peaks at 13 miles. Not the right plan for you? Check out Runner's World's training plans for beginners and advanced runners.

Sample Day 2
5mi
5 Miles Easy

Run at a relaxed pace today, or cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer for the same amount of time that you'd run. Just don't go so hard that you're sore tomorrow.

Sample Day 3
7mi
7 Miles Hills

Run today's mileage on any hilly route.

Sample Day 4
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Keep a comfortable, conversational pace, about one to two minutes slower than your 5K pace. Or you can cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer.

Sample Day 5
6mi
6 Miles Easy

Run at a relaxed pace today, or cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer for the same amount of time that you'd run. Just don't go so hard that you're sore tomorrow.

Sample Day 7
7mi
7 Miles LSD

This is a long, slow run to build endurance. Run at an easy, conversational pace, one to two minutes slower than your goal race pace.

Sample Day 9
5mi
5 Miles Easy

It's important to keep your easy days easy throughout training so that you have the energy and fitness to give your all to the quality workouts, like tempo runs and long runs. In order to do that, it's a good idea to learn the best target pace for all your runs on the schedule. If you have run a race within the past six months, plug that time into our training calculator at runnersworld.com/tools. Look at the 'training paces' to find your pace for each of the runs on the schedule. If you don't have a recent race time, do a one-mile time trial. Here's how: Go to a track or any one-mile stretch of road. After a 10-minute warmup, time yourself while running four laps (or one mile) as fast as you can. Note your time, then cool down with 10 minutes of walking and jogging. Plug your time into the training calculator.

Sample Day 10
7mi
7 Miles Hills

Run today's mileage on any hilly route.