RW Beginners Half Marathon Plan (14 weeks)

Training Load By Week
Training Load By Week

This 14-week plan was designed by the experts at Runner's World for beginners who have at least a year of experience running on a regular basis and log an average of 15 to 20 miles per week. Each week includes three days of rest, three days of shorter runs, and one long run, which starts at six miles, builds gradually, and peaks at 12 miles to give you the endurance you need to get comfortable running for two hours at a time. Not the right plan for you? Check out Runner's World's training plans for intermediate and advanced runners.

Sample Day 2
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Run at a relaxed pace today, or cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer for the same amount of time that you'd run. Just don't go so hard that you're sore tomorrow.

Sample Day 3
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Keep a comfortable, conversational pace, about one to two minutes slower than your 5K pace. Or you can cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer.

Sample Day 5
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Keep a comfortable conversational pace, about one to two minutes slower than your 5K pace. Or you can cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer.

Sample Day 7
5mi
5 Miles LSD

Today is your first long run. Since you'll be running farther, you can go out even slower than you usually do. On your long runs, your goal is just to complete the distance. If you have to walk, that's fine. As long as you cover the distance, today's workout is a success.

Sample Day 9
4mi
4 Miles Easy

It's important to keep your easy days easy throughout training so that you have the energy and fitness to give your all to the quality workouts, like tempo runs and long runs. In order to do that, it's a good idea to learn the best target pace for all your runs on the schedule. If you have run a race within the past six months, plug that time into our training calculator at runnersworld.com/tools. Look at the 'training paces' to find your pace for each of the runs on the schedule. If you don't have a recent race time, do a one-mile time trial. Here's how: Go to a track or any one-mile stretch of road. After a 10-minute warmup, time yourself while running four laps (or one mile) as fast as you can. Note your time, then cool down with 10 minutes of walking and jogging. Plug your time into the training calculator.

Sample Day 10
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Training logs can be great tools to track your progress and help prevent injuries. Write down details about the mileage you ran, how you felt while you were on the run, what the weather was like, and how you felt afterward. Be sure to include your race goals and the reasons you're training for a marathon. When you feel the urge to call it quits, pull out that log. Seeing all your plans--and all that you've already accomplished--can help get you out the door.

Sample Day 12
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Run at a relaxed pace today, or cross-train on a bike or an elliptical trainer for the same amount of time that you'd run. Just don't go so hard that you're sore tomorrow.