RW Intermediate 10K Plan (6 weeks)

Training Load By Week
Training Load By Week

This six-week schedule was designed by the experts at Runner's World to help intermediate runners - those who have been running for at least a year, have completed some 5Ks and 10Ks, and want to develop the stamina to finish a 10K faster. Each week features two days of rest, two days of easy running, some tempo- runs, and intervals done at race pace or slightly faster. Not the right plan for you? Check out Runner's World's training plans for beginners and advanced runners.

Sample Day 2
6mi
6 Miles Easy

Hook up with a buddy or a running club for long runs--you'll be surprised how easily the miles roll by when you're in good company. Don't know other runners? Log into our online community at runnersworld.com, where you'll find regional groups and forums. Or contact a running shop in your area. Many shops organize group long runs in the spring and fall.

Sample Day 4
4mi
4 Miles Easy

Maintain a comfortable pace that feels easy enough to hold a conversation.

Sample Day 5
4mi
4 Miles Easy with Strides

4 miles easy 4 strides Run at a conversational pace for four miles. Then finish off with four strides. Over 100 meters, gradually accelerate until you reach 90 percent of all-out effort. Hold that effort for five seconds, then smoothly decelerate. Walk to full recovery after each stride.

Sample Day 7
6mi
6 Miles Easy

Maintain a comfortable pace that feels easy enough to hold a conversation.

Sample Day 9
6mi
6 Miles Easy

Maintain a conversational pace for six miles

Sample Day 11
4mi
4 Miles Easy

It's important to keep your easy days easy throughout training so that you have the energy and fitness to give your all to the quality workouts, like tempo runs and long runs. In order to do that, it's a good idea to learn the best target pace for all your runs on the schedule. If you have run a race within the past six months, plug that time into our training calculator at runnersworld.com/tools. Look at the 'training paces' to find your pace for each of the runs on the schedule. If you don't have a recent race time, do a one-mile time trial. Here's how: Go to a track or any one-mile stretch of road. After a 10-minute warmup, time yourself while running four laps (or one mile) as fast as you can. Note your time, then cool down with 10 minutes of walking and jogging. Plug your time into the training calculator.

Sample Day 12
4.5mi
4.5 Miles Easy with Strides

Maintain a conversational pace for 4.5 miles. Finish off with five strides. For the strides, over 100 meters, gradually accelerate until you reach 90 percent of all-out effort. Hold that effort for five seconds, then smoothly decelerate. Walk to full recovery after each stride.