Cycling: 8-Week Peak Performance - by KyleCoaching

Average Weekly Training Hours 10:12
Training Load By Week
Average Weekly Training Hours 10:12
Training Load By Week
Sample Day 2
1:30:00
27mi
100TSS
LT-W2: Lactate Threshold: Basic Ride 2

Fast pedaling intervals teach your muscles to be ready for changes in speed at any time. Since the goal is based on cadence and not wattage, be sure to keep your power lower when doing these. After warming up, complete 5-10 fast pedal intervals. Keep your cadence over 100 rpm, resting 1 minute between intervals. To recover, ride easy for 10 minutes. Next, do two 15-minute intervals at Lactate Threshold with a 5-minute rest between efforts. Warm-down.

Sample Day 3
1:30:00
27mi
100TSS
NP-W1: 10 Second Bursts

After a standard warm-up, set a pace in the lower end of tempo and hold it steady for the next hour. During this hour, do a 10-second, out of the saddle, burst every 3 minutes, trying to reach 180% of your FTP shifting only a few times.

Sample Day 4
1:00:00
16mi
30TSS
AR-W1: Active Recovery

Active Recovery (AR) is perhaps more difficult than a VO2max interval efforts. Research suggests that a body better recovers from a taxing training day when treated to a light and easy effort rather than lying on the couch. The key is LIGHT and EASY. Power, heart rate and your competitive spirit must remain low. Just spin the legs at a normal cadence (neither fast nor slow) at Do not place force on the pedals or allow lactate to build up in the legs. Basically, Spin at a rate that has enough resistance so you are not bouncing on the pedals but not so much that you create more lactate in your legs, regardless of the terrain. The goal is to preserve the "feel" for the legs and muscles, but to go really easy.

Sample Day 5
2:00:00
120TSS
SubLT-W1: Jumps and Sweet Spot Training (SST)

SST Intervals. On trainer, out on road or in a group, SST intervals are part of our continued effort to build and maintain base.

Sample Day 6
3:00:00
54mi
169TSS
END-W6: 3 Hr Endurance

Long day in the saddle. Not a good time to mix up embrocation and cambois butter! Make sure you plan a route with ample rehydration options.

Sample Day 7
2:30:00
45mi
150TSS
END-W2: Endurance with Tempo

Endurance efforts help to build the aerobic engine without creating a great deal of training stress on the body. The fast-paced shop ride where you try to drop everyone in sight does not fall in this category. The rate of perceived exertion varies, higher on the hills than on the flats, but you should be able to carry on a conversation with your riding partner throughout the entire effort. The intent on this ride is to get up to your endurance zone and then do several efforts at tempo. Really stretch out the legs, in the drops and hammering out zone 3. Try to avoid Zone 4 and higher. Assessment: You should end this ride with about an hour in endurance and an hour in tempo, leaning a little more toward tempo.

Sample Day 9
1:00:00
16mi
30TSS
AR-W1: Active Recovery

Active Recovery (AR) is perhaps more difficult than a VO2max interval efforts. Research suggests that a body better recovers from a taxing training day when treated to a light and easy effort rather than lying on the couch. The key is LIGHT and EASY. Power, heart rate and your competitive spirit must remain low. Just spin the legs at a normal cadence (neither fast nor slow) at Do not place force on the pedals or allow lactate to build up in the legs. Basically, Spin at a rate that has enough resistance so you are not bouncing on the pedals but not so much that you create more lactate in your legs, regardless of the terrain. The goal is to preserve the "feel" for the legs and muscles, but to go really easy.

Charles Kyle, NPTI-CPT
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KyleCoaching, LLC

Road Cycling and Cyclocross training plans and coaching. For Pricing and Questions, please email me at chuck@kylecoaching.com

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