Leadville 100 MTB

Average Weekly Training Hours 11:53
Training Load By Week
Average Weekly Training Hours 11:53
Training Load By Week

Use this plan to prepare for the epic challenge that is the Leadville MTB 100.

2 ways to use the plan:

Apply the plan so it ends on the day of the event, August 10.
-- OR --
Apply the plan early and repeat some of the weeks to get you up to race day.

Midweek rides are kept manageable in duration (< 2hrs), while you will have one progressively longer weekend ride. Total hours per week maxes out at just under 16hrs. If you have the flexibility in your schedule, you can add some volume, but don't sacrifice the planned intensity for additional volume. While you will be on the bike for a long time on race day, the intensity is what will break you down. Use the longer days to dial in your equipment and nutrition. You'll need to put down a ton of calories on race day, and training your gut is important too.

Sample Day 2
2:00:00
80TSS
Low Zone 2 w/ cadence work

Low Zone 2 ride to provide aerobic capacity stimulus with decreased strain. Includes cadence work to layer neurological work on top of aerobic capacity development.

Pace can be guided by either HR or Power, but utilizing HR may do a better job of regulating intensity regardless of fatigue levels.

By HR: 65-70% of Max Heart Rate
By Power: 56-65% of estimated FTP
By Feel: conversational pace, something you could maintain for several hours

Sample Day 3
1:00:00
18.5TSS
RECOVERY RIDE (60)

A RECOVERY RIDE is super easy, easier than you think it should be. It is an opportunity to exercise DISCIPLINE and put it in the small ring and just spin around like it's a walk in the park.

A recovery ride should NEVER exceed 90 minutes. You can certainly do a longer easy ride, but it will be just that: an easy ride, but not a recovery ride. In my opinion, an easy ride over 90 minutes is just junk time and is of no benefit to your performance.

Around 85% of cyclists go too hard on their recovery rides, defeating the purpose entirely, so aim to join the 15% club. A recovery ride shouldn’t give your body any real training stimulus at all. In other words, it should be of a level so easy that you’re not actually exercising.

Sample Day 3
0:15:00
Stretching

Spend 10-15 minutes stretching. Focus on quads, hamstrings and calves.

You can expand your routine if you'd like. This is a reasonable set of stretches you can do quickly and without any equipment.

http://www.bikeradar.com/us/gear/article/stretches-for-cyclists-26074/

Sample Day 4
1:41:00
97.56TSS
[test] POWER Field Test (2x8min efforts)

30-45min progressive warm-up (as if you were warming up for a short TT)
2 x 8min ON at "best effort" with 10min OFF at Z1-2
30mins at Z2

---

If you don't have a power meter, you can still do this test as practice for the HR test. Just approach the efforts as an 8min time trial.

Sample Day 5
1:00:00
18.5TSS
RECOVERY RIDE (60)

A RECOVERY RIDE is super easy, easier than you think it should be. It is an opportunity to exercise DISCIPLINE and put it in the small ring and just spin around like it's a walk in the park.

A recovery ride should NEVER exceed 90 minutes. You can certainly do a longer easy ride, but it will be just that: an easy ride, but not a recovery ride. In my opinion, an easy ride over 90 minutes is just junk time and is of no benefit to your performance.

Around 85% of cyclists go too hard on their recovery rides, defeating the purpose entirely, so aim to join the 15% club. A recovery ride shouldn’t give your body any real training stimulus at all. In other words, it should be of a level so easy that you’re not actually exercising.

Sample Day 5
0:15:00
Stretching

Spend 10-15 minutes stretching. Focus on quads, hamstrings and calves.

You can expand your routine if you'd like. This is a reasonable set of stretches you can do quickly and without any equipment.

http://www.bikeradar.com/us/gear/article/stretches-for-cyclists-26074/

Sample Day 6
2:00:00
108.4TSS
[test] HEART RATE Field Test (30min effort HR/W)

30min progressive warm-up (as if you were warming up for 10mi TT)

30min best effort. The goal is the best steady output you can hold for the duration. Don't start out strong and then fade. Try to use a stretch of road with minimal interruptions. A gradual climb is good if you have one (3-5% steady grade).

Your average Heart Rate for the last 20mins is a good estimation of your Threshold Heart Rate.

To estimate your FTP for Power Zones:
1. Take your "best" 20min Average Power during the test and multiple by 95%.
2. Put this number in TrainingPeaks as your Threshold Power.
3. Use the Coggan formula for setting your zones.

Note: while 95% of your 20min Power "may" not accurately reflect the Average Power you could sustain for 60 minutes (FTP), this doesn't mean it is NOT a good number from which to calculate training zones. In my experience, training zones calculated from this higher "threshold" value will be well-matched to your aerobic capacity and not as affected by muscular endurance as a 60min test.

Jeff Winkler
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Winkler Cycling

Over the past 25 years, I have coached athletes to multiple State and National Championship titles in the disciplines of Road, MTB and Cyclocross. I have worked with all levels of individual racers from novice to professional and have coached collegiate, club and amateur teams.