10 Weeks to 100- Century Training Plan for Intermediate to Advanced Cyclists (HR Optional)

Training Load By Week
Training Load By Week

Looking to complete a strong century (100 mile) bike ride? If you are an intermediate to experienced cyclist, this is a great plan for you to ensure that you cover all the bases needed to have a great experience and perform to your potential on the day of your ride. Endurance, cadence development, anaerobic fitness, and hill power development are all factored into this straightforward, heart rate compatible plan, to get you fit and ready for anything that your century may throw at you in terms of geography or wind resistance.

Sample Day 2
25mi
Endurance

Moderate effort with comfortable breathing at 90-95 rpm. Occasional more labored breathing on hills without redlining (going anaerobic).

Improves fat-burning efficiency and therefore increases the ability to ride for long distances without tapping into limited fuel stores (glycogen). Also improves cardiovascular endurance significantly as more volume is put in.

If using heart rate this is mostly a Z2 ride.

Sample Day 4
20mi
Tempo

A focused effort that emphasizes building strength without going anaerobic. Performed at 80-85 rpms in a harder gear than your endurance rides, tempo work improves muscular endurance, glycogen storage,
and cardiovascular endurance.

Each tempo ride in this program should be preceded by a 5 mile warm up and 5 mile cool down at an easy to moderate effort level (90-95 rpm). For example, if the schedule dictates a 20 mile tempo workout, only 15 of those miles are to be ridden at tempo effort, as 5 miles are for warming up and 5 for cooling down. If using heart rate zones, aim for a Z3 average for your tempo mileage portion.

Sample Day 6
30mi
Endurance

Moderate effort with comfortable breathing at 90-95 rpm. Occasional more labored breathing on hills without redlining (going anaerobic). This is Z2 for the most part if using heart rate.

Sample Day 7
20mi
Cadence- Spin-Ups

In the small ring at a very light resistance, perform 5x1:00 effort. For each effort, gradually increase cadence to maximum by the 0:40 mark. Max cadence is that which you can sustain without your hips rocking (“bouncing”). If your hips begin to bounce, lower cadence until they are no longer bouncing. This is your max cadence. Hold that max cadence for the last 0:20 of the repeat, relaxing your toes and upper body. Recover with 3:00 of easy spinning in the small ring after each interval.

Sample Day 9
25mi
Power- Sprints

Warm Up: 5 miles light spinning

Set: 6x1:00 seated sprints at 100+ rpm in the big ring. Effort: Maximal, HR Z5a-c

Recovery: 3:00 easy spin between efforts in the small ring, comfortable cadence

Cool Down: Remaining mileage at Endurance intensity (Z2)

Sample Day 11
25mi
Tempo

Five mile warm up and cool down, 15 miles of tempo. A focused effort that emphasizes building strength without going anaerobic. Performed at 80-85 rpms in a harder gear than your endurance rides to build strength. If using heart rate zones, aim for a Z3 average for your tempo mileage portion.

Sample Day 13
40mi
Endurance

Moderate effort with comfortable breathing at 90-95 rpm. Occasional more labored breathing on hills without redlining (going anaerobic). This is Z2 for the most part if using heart rate.

Ben Bartlett
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Bartlett Multisport

Aside from competing at a semiprofessional level for the last ten years in triathlon, Coach Bartlett has successfully coached a range of abilities in endurance sport (triathletes, runners, cyclists, and swimmers), from beginners to advanced NCAA D1 graduates from varsity collegiate swim/run programs. Coach Bartlett interacts with his athletes on a daily or bi-daily with feedback. Programs for athletes are built and adjusted on a weekly basis according to how athletes respond to their training.